Traveling Languages Series Post: A

If you’re thinking of traveling to other countries, it’s interesting to see the languages officially used there. I’m hoping this series will help you plan which countries to visit to practice, study, or hear a rare language or simply just to know which languages are official in which state.

  •  Afghanistan

    • Pashto (statewide) (official)
    • Dari (statewide) (official)
    • Uzbek (statewide) (third official language in areas where spoken by majority of population)
    • Turkmen (statewide) (third official language in areas where spoken by majority of population)
    • Pashai (statewide) (third official language in areas where spoken by majority of population)
    • Nuristani (statewide) (third official language in areas where spoken by majority of population)
    • Balochi (statewide) (third official language in areas where spoken by majority of population)
    • Pamiri (statewide) (third official language in areas where spoken by majority of population)
  •  Albania

    • Albanian (based on Tosk dialect)
  •  Algeria
    • Arabic (official and national)
    • Tamazight (national)
  •  Andorra (Languages of Andorra)

    • Catalan
  •  Angola

    • Portuguese
  •  Antigua and Barbuda
    • English (de facto official)
  •  Argentina
    • Spanish (de facto)
    • Guaraní (co-official in Corrientes Province)
  •  Armenia
    • Armenian
    • Kurdish (Minority language)
    • Russian (Minority language)
  •  Australia
    • No official language, English is the de facto official language.
  •  Austria
    • German (official statewide)
    • Croatian (official in Burgenland in areas with a Croat minority) (statewide minority language)
    • Slovene (official in Carinthia and Styria in areas with a Slovene minority) (statewide minority language)
    • Czech (statewide minority language)
    • Hungarian (in Burgenland) (statewide minority language)
    • Slovak (statewide minority language)
    • Romani (statewide minority language)
  •  Azerbaijan
    • Azerbaijani
    • Armenian (Nagorno-Karabagh)

Info retrieved from Wikipedia.

Advertisements

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s