Traveling Languages Series Post: N

If you’re thinking of traveling to other countries, it’s interesting to see the languages officially used there. I’m hoping this series will help you plan which countries to visit to practice, study, or hear a rare language or simply just to know which languages are official in which state.

  •  Namibia

    • English
    • Afrikaans (national language)
    • German (regional language)
    • Oshiwambo (regional language)
  •  Nauru
    • English
    • Nauruan
  •  Nepal
    • Nepali
  •  Netherlands
    • Dutch (de facto, statewide)
    • West Frisian (in Friesland)
    • Limburgish (regional language)
    • Low Saxon (regional language)
    • Papiamento (on Aruba, Curaçao and Bonaire)
    • English (on Sint Maarten, Sint Eustatius and Saba)
  •  New Zealand
    • English is a de facto official language (statewide)
    • Maori (statewide)
    • NZSL (NZ Deaf community)
    • Tokelauan (in Tokelau)
    • Cook Islands Maori (in Cook Islands)
    • Niuean (in Niue)
  •  Nicaragua
    • Spanish
  •  Niger
    • French
    • Hausa (national)
    • Fulfulde (national)
    • Gulmancema (national)
    • Kanuri (national)
    • Zarma (national)
    • Tamasheq (national)
  •  Nigeria
    • English (official)
    • Hausa (national)
    • Yoruba (national)
    • Igbo (national)
  •  Norway (Languages of Norway)
    • Norwegian (statewide) (Bokmål and Nynorsk are the official forms, and municipalities choose between them or a neutral stance)
    • Sami (indigenous language in vast areas from Engerdal to the Russian border, official administrative language in Kautokeino, Karasjok, Gáivuotna – Kåfjord, Nesseby,Porsanger, Tana, Tysfjord, and Snåsa)
    • Kven (national minority language, administrative language in Porsanger)
    • Romani (national minority language)
    • Scandoromani (national minority language)

Info retrieved from Wikipedia.

Advertisements

Traveling Languages Series Post: B

If you’re thinking of traveling to other countries, it’s interesting to see the languages officially used there. I’m hoping this series will help you plan which countries to visit to practice, study, or hear a rare language or simply just to know which languages are official in which state.

  •  Bahamas
    • English
  •  Bahrain
    • Arabic
  •  Bangladesh
    • Bengali
  •  Barbados
    • English
  •  Belarus
    • Belarusian
    • Russian
  •  Belgium (Languages of Belgium)[12]
    • Dutch (Official only in Flanders, including Brussels)
    • French (Official only in Brussels and in Wallonia, though not in the German-speaking Community of Belgium)
    • German (Official only in the German-speaking Community of Belgium)
  •  Belize
    • English (Official language)
    • Kriol (the lingua franca)
    • Spanish (Minority language spoken on the border with Mexico and Guatemala)
  •  Benin
    • French
  •  Bhutan
    • Dzongkha
  •  Bolivia
    • Spanish
    • Aymara
    • Quechua
  •  Bosnia and Herzegovina
    • Bosnian
    • Croatian
    • Serbian
  •  Botswana
    • English
    • Tswana (national)
  •  Brazil
    • Portuguese (national, all cities)
    • German (in Pomerode, Santa Catarina)
    • Pomeranian (in Pancas[14][15] and Santa Maria de Jetibá, in Espírito Santo)
    • Hunsrückisch (in Antônio Carlos, Santa Catarina)
    • Talian (in Serafina Corrêa, Rio Grande do Sul)
    • Nheengatu, Baniwa and Tucano (in São Gabriel da Cachoeira, Amazonas)
    • Guarani (in Tacuru, Mato Grosso do Sul)
  •  Brunei
    • Malay
  •  Bulgaria
    • Bulgarian
  •  Burkina Faso
    • French
    • Fula (national)
    • Jula (national)
    • More (national)
  •  Burundi
    • French
    • Kirundi
Info retrieved from Wikipedia.

Memes, Signs, Tips!

en2 Like everyone else, I love a good meme. Every few days I’ll be posting some favourites I’ve made and seen. Some will actually be photos I’ve taken on my travels. If you spot any, check out the next in the series to see if you got it right :-)!  Also, check out the helpful tips below. The memes may be funny but their significance could mean the difference between a great or terrible trip!
es2Como la otra persona, me gustan memes! A veces, voy a publicar mis favoritos: algunos he visto y algunos he hecho. Vas a ver unos fotos de mis viajes. Si tú ves estás fotos, puedes adivinar de donde las tomé. Voy a responder en la próxima entrada de Memes, Signs, & Tips!. También, hay consejos relacionados debajo. Algunos son la diferencia entre un viaje bueno o malo!

Memes

en2

Tips

  1. Do not assume numbering systems at home will be the same in your destination countries.
  2. Be prepared for a few snags in your well-planned travel schedule. Public transportation is usually efficient, but during rush hour, you shouldn’t expect to just hop right on.
  3. Prospective employers love to hear about your travels. Especially if you’re able to connect it to some job skill.
  4. I hate when people feel the need to stand up the second we land, especially when I’m forced to get up for them.

es2

Consejos

  1. Los sistemas de numeros podrián ser diferentes en el país destino que en tu país de origen.
  2. Debes preparar para errores in tus planes mientras estás viajando. El transporte público es usualmente eficiente, pero durante las horas pico no debes esperar a saltar justo al metro o los autobúses.
  3. Empleadores posibles les encanta escuchar sobre tus viajes. Especialmente si puedes conectarlo con una habilidad laboral.
  4. No me gusta cuando la gente se levanta el instante en que el avión toca el suelo. Luego, sobre todo no me gusta cuando estoy obligado a levantarse para ellos.