Tag Archives: tips

Tips for if you get lost #2

Oh, yeah, about cognates. Some of them are false cognates, meaning that the words in both languages sound or are spelt the same, but they have different meanings. Don’t say these things if you don’t mean them haha!

False Spanish Cognates

English Spanish
globe globo (balloon)
pie pie (foot)
rope ropa (clothes)
soap sopa (soup or pasta)
large largo (long)
exit éxito (success)
hay hay (there is)

False German Cognates

German English English German
Achsel shoulder axle Achse
Advokat lawyer advocate Befürworter
After rectum after nach
Akt nude (artwork); act (theater) act (deed) Tat
alle Tage alle Tage all day den ganzen Tag
English: Map of world languages.
Map of world languages
Advertisements

Knowing what to say: Border

Going to Spain? Want to expand your Spanish vocabulary in the meanwhile? Me too! So, we’ll help each other out. I’ll make  a list of words I think are important or interesting to know for a study abroad trip to Spain. Do you have any words you think that I should know in Spanish? suggest them and I’ll follow up.

la franjafran’-hah

noun ( strip, band; border, fringe )

Examples

  1. Vivo en la franja de tierra cerca del río.

    I live on the strip of land near the river.

  2. Me gusta mucho la franja amarilla en este vestido.

    I really like the yellow fringe on this dress.

Idioms

  1. la franja (horaria) de máxima audiencia

    prime time (television)

  2. la franja de edad

    age range / age-group


Brought to you by http://www.spanishdict.com

Tips for if you get lost #1

Okay, so I was thinking. I’m not exactly a Spanish pro, so if I got lost in Spain I may not know what to say. Which reminded my of a trick I once had to employ. By saying some of the words I didn’t know in English, but with a Spanish accent, I was able to explain something to a Spanish lady I work with who isn’t fluent in English. Listen, I know you must think I’m off my rockers to give you such advice, but think about the fact that language, just like anything else, evolves over time, and will absorb elements from surrounding languages and cultures. So, just in case you weren’t sure, I’ll be pointing out many words, which when said (in English, but not like English), mean the same or near the same in other languages. Oh, and yeah, these are referred to as cognates 🙂. Will also be including spanish cognates for other languages.

Spanish Cognates

English  German  (Special) Sound
garage  garaje  [gah-rah’-hay] – “j” is pronounced like an “h”
garden  jardin  har-deen
gasoline  gasolina  gah-soh-lee-na
general  general  hay-nay-rahl : in words beginning with “ge”, the “g” sounds like an “h”

German Cognates

English  German  (Special) Sound
 accent  akzent
 America  Amerika
 vague  vage  vaghe
 villa  villa
 vanilla  vanille  vah-nil-ay

Russian Cognates

English Spanish  Russian-Phonetic
night noche  noch
salt sal  sol
snow  sneg
water  vodA
sun  solntse
milk  miluko
nose  nOs
English: Map of world languages.
Map of world languages

Airlines again :)

Domestic (Foreign) Multi-City Stops

Okay. So, if you are planning on buying multi-city tickets like me for your study abroad trip (

Image

It’s not every day you get to fly 4,000 miles across the horizon, might as well stop by a few places on the way to your final destination), you should consider the type of airline you using. Think about it: major US airlines are probably transporting U.S. tourists or other international travelers, so it wouldn’t make sense for them to be making stops all over the place right? Right. the major U.S. airlines that I looked are charging more for the inter-European legs of my trip. Domestic airlines such as RyanAir.com found me a ticket for about US$ 60 less than what companies like American or United were charging me for the same route. So, I plan to enter the first European city-stop via my trusty U.S. airliner, and for any inter-european flights afterwards, I will use domestic liners.

Miles & Alliances

This image shows to wich airline alliance belo...

Another thing to look is for is Airline Alliances. U.S. airlines have partnered up with each other domestically and with foreign liners in the international market. When looking at cashing in your miles for study abroad (like I’m doing), its good to check what companies miles are actually worth more per mile (when flying internationally as opposed to domestically). This is because when some U.S. miles are used with international partner carriers, they count for less than they would at home. Also, some alliances (although having the same amount of partners) are more region-oriented than others. For instance, Oneworld alliance doesn’t have a Chinese partner, and Star Alliance only recently initiated partnership proceedings with two Mexico-related coverage liners (TACA and COPA). For my study abroad in Spain, I had names like Iberia, Air France, British Airways, and American Airlines resulting in the lowest prices. Oneworld alliance, though deficient in some regions, was my cheapest bet to Spain (Iberia, British Airways, and American Airlines are all in the Oneworld Alliance).

Funding tip

Always remember to check with your financial aid office about possible funding that your school may offer. Also check into seeing if a financial aid advisor at your school is willing to increase your cost of attendance. This value is the maximum amount of financial aid you are allowed to receive in grants, loans, scholarships, etc. Because you will most likely be spending more on school-approved educational programmes during your study abroad semester than a regular student would, your cost of attendance is greater and you are allowed more financial aid to be counted as financial aid (as opposed to taxable income).