Tag Archives: words

Traveling Languages Series Post: T, U

If you’re thinking of traveling to other countries, it’s interesting to see the languages officially used there. I’m hoping this series will help you plan which countries to visit to practice, study, or hear a rare language or simply just to know which languages are official in which state.

  •  Tajikistan
    • Tajik (national)
    • Russian (for interethnic communication)
  •  Tanzania
    • Swahili (national)
    • English
  •  Thailand
    • Thai
  •  Togo
    • French
  •  Tonga
    • English
    • Tongan (national)
  •  Trinidad and Tobago
    • English
  •  Tunisia
    • Arabic (national)
    • French
  •  Turkey
    • Turkish
  •  Turkmenistan
    • Turkmen (national)
    • Russian (for interethnic communication)
  •  Tuvalu
    • English
    • Tuvaluan (national)
  •  Uganda
    • English
    • Swahili
  •  Ukraine
    • Ukrainian
  •  United Arab Emirates
    • Arabic
  •  United Kingdom and overseas territories
    • English,with the following specifications:
      • English (in Anguilla, Bermuda, the British Indian Ocean Territory, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, the Falkland Islands, Gibraltar, Guernsey, Isle of Man, Jersey, Montserrat, Northern Ireland (de facto), the Pitcairn Islands, Saint Helena and Turks and Caicos Islands)
      • Cornish (minority language in Cornwall)
      • Dgèrnésiais (in Guernsey)
      • French (in Guernsey and Jersey)
      • Irish (in Northern Ireland)
      • Jèrriais (in Jersey)
      • Manx (in the Isle of Man)
      • Pitcairnese (in the Pitcairn Islands)
      • Scots (in Scotland)
        • Ulster-Scots (in Northern Ireland)
      • Scottish Gaelic (in Scotland)
      • Welsh (in Wales)
  •  United States
    • No official language nationwide, English is the de facto but not the de jure official language (at the federal level). Spanish is the second-most commonly used language in the U.S. and many forms and documents are published in both languages.
  •  Uruguay
    • Spanish
  •  Uzbekistan
    • Uzbek (national)
    • Russian (for interethnic communication)

Info retrieved from Wikipedia.

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Traveling Languages Series Post: V, Y, Z, & Others

If you’re thinking of traveling to other countries, it’s interesting to see the languages officially used there. I’m hoping this series will help you plan which countries to visit to practice, study, or hear a rare language or simply just to know which languages are official in which state.

 

  •  Vanuatu
    • Bislama (national)
    • English
    • French
  •  Vatican City
    • Italian (de facto—see Languages of Vatican City).
  •  Venezuela
    • Spanish
  •  Vietnam
    • Vietnamese
  •  Yemen
    • Arabic
  •  Zambia
    • English
  •  Zimbabwe
    • English
    • Shona
    • Northern Ndebele

Partially Recognized States

  •  Abkhazia
    • Abkhazian
    • Russian
  •  Kosovo
    • Albanian
    • Serbian
    • Turkish (regional)
  •  Nagorno-Karabakh
    • Armenian
  •  Northern Cyprus
    • Turkish
  •  Palestine
    • Arabic
  •  Sahrawi Republic
    • Arabic
    • Spanish
  •  Somaliland
    • Somalian
    • Arabic
    • English
  •  South Ossetia
    • Ossetian
    • Russian
    • Georgian (regional)
  •  Taiwan
    • Chinese
    • Taiwanese (recognized regional language)
  •  Transnistria
    • Moldavian
    • Russian
    • Ukrainian

Info retrieved from Wikipedia.

Traveling Languages Series Post: O, P

If you’re thinking of traveling to other countries, it’s interesting to see the languages officially used there. I’m hoping this series will help you plan which countries to visit to practice, study, or hear a rare language or simply just to know which languages are official in which state.

  •  Oman
    • Arabic
  •  Pakistan
    • Urdu (national Language; official)
    • English (official Language)
    • Sindhi (provincial language of Sindh)
    • Other major languages like Punjabi, Balochi and Pashto have no official recognition
  •  Palau
    • English (statewide)
    • Palauan (statewide)
    • Sonsorolese (in Sonsorol)
    • Tobian (in Hatohobei)
    • Japanese (in Angaur)
  •  Panama
    • Spanish
  •  Papua New Guinea
    • English
    • Hiri Motu
    • Tok Pisin
  •  Paraguay
    • Spanish
    • Guaraní
  •  Peru
    • Spanish (Official)
    • Aymara (co-official)
    • Quechua (co-official)
    • All native languages in areas where they are spoken by the majority of people
  •  Philippines
    • Filipino (statewide) (national)
    • English (statewide)
    • Arabic (Recognised as “voluntary and optional” statewide)
    • Spanish (Recognised as “voluntary and optional” statewide)
    • Bikol Central (Recognized as “auxiliary official” in Luzon)
    • Cebuano (“auxiliary official” in Visayas and Mindanao)
    • Chavacano (“auxiliary official” in Basilan and Zamboanga Peninsula)
    • Hiligaynon (“auxiliary official” in Visayas and Mindanao)
    • Ilokano (“auxiliary official” in Luzon)
    • Kapampangan (“auxiliary official” in Luzon)
    • Kinaray-a (“auxiliary official” in the Visayas)
    • Maranao (“auxiliary official” in Mindanao)
    • Maguindanao (“auxiliary official” in Mindanao)
    • Pangasinan (“auxiliary official” in Luzon)
    • Tagalog (“auxiliary official” in Luzon)
    • Tausug (“auxiliary official” in Mindanao)
    • Waray-Waray (“auxiliary official” in the Visayas)
  •  Poland
    • Polish (sole official language of state)
    • Kashubian (recognised regional language and auxiliary language in part of Pomeranian Voivodeship)
    • German (minority language and auxiliary language in part of Opole Voivodeship)
    • Lithuanian (minority language and auxiliary language) in Puńsk commune, Podlaskie Voivodeship
    • Belarusian (minority language and auxiliary language in Hajnówka commune, Podlaskie Voivodeship)
  •  Portugal (Languages of Portugal)
    • Portuguese (official)
    • Mirandese (regional, in Miranda do Douro)

 

Info retrieved from Wikipedia.

Traveling Languages Series Post: Q, R

If you’re thinking of traveling to other countries, it’s interesting to see the languages officially used there. I’m hoping this series will help you plan which countries to visit to practice, study, or hear a rare language or simply just to know which languages are official in which state.

  •  Qatar
    • Arabic
  •  Romania
    • Romanian (statewide)
    • Armenian (minority language)
    • German (minority language)
    • Hungarian (minority language)
    • Romani (minority language)
    • Serbian (minority language)
    • Slovakian (minority language)
    • Turkish (minority language)
    • Ukrainian (minority language)
  •  Russia (Languages of Russia)
    • Russian (federal; official)
    • Abaza (in the Karachay–Cherkess Republic)
    • Adyghe (in the Republic of Adygea)
    • Agul (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Altay (in the Altai Republic)
    • Avar (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Azerbaijani (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Bashkir (in the Republic of Bashkortostan)
    • Buryat (in Buryat Republic)
    • Chechen (in the Chechen Republic and Republic of Dagestan)
    • Chuvash (in the Chuvash Republic)
    • Dargin (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Erzya (in the Republic of Mordovia)
    • Ingush (in the Republic of Ingushetia)
    • Kabardian (in the Kabardino-Balkar and Karachay–Cherkess Republics)
    • Kalmyk (in the Republic of Kalmykia)
    • Karachay-Balkar (in the Kabardino-Balkar and Karachay–Cherkess Republics)
    • Khakas (in the Republic of Khakassia)
    • Komi-Zyrian (in the Komi Republic)
    • Kumyk (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Lak (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Lezgian (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Mari (in the Mari El Republic)
    • Moksha (in the Republic of Mordovia)
    • Nogai (in the Karachay–Cherkess Republic and in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Ossetic (in the Republic of North Ossetia–Alania)
    • Rutul (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Sakha (in the Sakha Republic)
    • Tabasaran (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Tatar (in the Republic of Tatarstan)
    • Tati (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Tsakhur (in the Republic of Dagestan)
    • Tuvin (in the Tuva Republic)
    • Udmurt (in the Republic of Udmurtia)
  •  Rwanda
    • English
    • French
    • Kinyarwanda

 

Info retrieved from Wikipedia.

Traveling Languages Series Post: I

If you’re thinking of traveling to other countries, it’s interesting to see the languages officially used there. I’m hoping this series will help you plan which countries to visit to practice, study, or hear a rare language or simply just to know which languages are official in which state.

  •  Iceland
    • Icelandic
    • Icelandic Sign Language
  •  India (Languages with official status in India)
    • English (statewide)
    • Hindi (Central Government, ten states, and Delhi, Chandigarh and Andaman and Nicobar Islands)
    • Assamese (in Assam)
    • Bengali (in Tripura, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, parts of Assam and West Bengal)
    • Bodo (in Assam)
    • Chhattisgarhi (in Chhattisgarh)
    • Dogri (in Jammu and Kashmir)
    • French (in Pondicherry)
    • Garo (in Meghalaya)
    • Gujarati (in Dadra and Nagar Haveli, Daman and Diu, and Gujarat)
    • Kannada (in Karnataka)
    • Karbi (in Assam)
    • Kashmiri (in Jammu and Kashmir)
    • Khasi (in Meghalaya)
    • Kokborok (in Tripura)
    • Konkani (in Goa and Mangalore)
    • Maithili (mentioned on the 8th schedule but no region specified, spoken in Bihar)
    • Malayalam (in Kerala and Pondicherry)
    • Meitei (in Manipur)
    • Marathi (in Maharashtra, Goa, Dadra and Nagar Haveli, Daman and Diu)
    • Mizo (in Mizoram)
    • Nepali (in Sikkim)
    • Nicobarese (in Andaman and Nicobar Islands)
    • Oriya (in Orissa)
    • Punjabi (in Punjab, Himachal pradesh, Haryana and Chandigarh)
    • Sanskrit (in Uttarakhand)
    • Santali (in Jharkhand)
    • Sindhi (not regionally specified)
    • Tamil (in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Pondicherry)
    • Telugu (in Andhra Pradesh and Pondicherry)
  •  Indonesia (Languages of Indonesia)
    • Indonesian (national and official)
    • Acehnese (in Aceh)
    • Batak (in North Sumatra)
    • Minangkabau (in West Sumatra)
    • Javanese (in Central Java, Yogyakarta and East Java)
    • Buginese (in South Sulawesi)
    • Banjar (in South Kalimantan)
    • Malay (in Riau, Jambi, West Kalimantan)
    • Sundanese (in Banten and West Java)
    • Balinese (in Bali)
    • Betawi (in Jakarta)
    • Madurese (in Madura)
  •  Iran
    • Persian
  •  Iraq
    • Arabic (statewide)
    • Kurdish (statewide)
    • Assyrian Neo-Aramaic (in assyrian areas)
    • Iraqi Turkmen (in Turkmen areas)
  •  Ireland (Languages of Ireland)

    • English (national)spoken by the 99% of the population
    • Irish (national) spoken by the 0.5% of the population
  •  Israel
    • Hebrew (de facto official)
    • Arabic (co-official)
  •  Italy (Languages of Italy)
    • Italian (statewide)
    • Albanian (in some parts of Southern Italy)
    • Catalan (in Alghero, Sardinia)
    • Croatian (in Montemitro & Acquaviva Collecroce & San Felice, Molise)
    • French (in Aosta Valley)
    • Friulian (in Friuli)
    • German (in South Tyrol)
    • Greek (in some parts of Apulia and Calabria)
    • Ladin (in some parts of Belluno, Veneto and Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol)
    • Sardinian (in Sardinia)
    • Sicilian (in Sicily)
    • Slovene (in some parts of Friuli-Venezia Giulia)
    • Venetian (in Veneto)

Info retrieved from Wikipedia.